Sunday, December 19, 2021

Bird legs added to drone so it can land on branches

 Drone's legs have been added to allow it to land on branches.


 

Bird Drone legs

Mark Cutkosky, an engineer at Stanford University in California, and David Lentink, a professor at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, have created a drone with claw-like legs.

Birds could sit on any branch, regardless of its size or abnormalities, the researchers discovered. This motivated them to continue working on their invention. It was, however, not especially simple to make.

"It's difficult to duplicate how birds fly and perch," William Roderick, a graduate student in both universities' labs, explains. They make takeoff and landing look so simple after millions of years of evolution, even with all the intricacy and diversity of tree branches found in a forest."

Cutkosky's team has spent years drawing inspiration from animals in order to apply their characteristics to robots, whereas Lentink's group has focused on airborne robots based on various birds. A study published in Science Robotics reflects the combined knowledge of the two universities.

The claws, called "stereotyped nature-inspired aerial grasper" (SNAG), are attached to a quadcopter drone, according to the study. The robot can fly, catch and carry objects, and land on diverse surfaces thanks to this addition.

"It's difficult to duplicate how birds fly and perch," William Roderick, a graduate student in both universities' labs, explains. They make takeoff and landing look so simple after millions of years of evolution, even with all the intricacy and diversity of tree branches found in a forest."

Cutkosky's team has spent years drawing inspiration from animals in order to apply their characteristics to robots, whereas Lentink's group has focused on airborne robots based on various birds. A study published in Science Robotics reflects the combined knowledge of the two universities.


 

drone claw
Image: popsci

 The claws, called "stereotyped nature-inspired aerial grasper" (SNAG), are attached to a quadcopter drone, according to the study. The robot can fly, catch and carry objects, and land on diverse surfaces thanks to this addition.

As a result of this invention, a robot with a powerful, high-speed clutch that can close in as little as 20 milliseconds has been created. SNAG's ankles lock and the robot stabilizes itself by wrapping itself around a grapple.

Roderick, whose parents are biologists and who is passionate about ecosystem conservation, says, "Part of the underlying reason for my work was to create tools that we can use to investigate the natural world." If we could create a robot that could mimic the behavior of a bird, it would open up totally new avenues for environmental research."

 

Article Author Gerluxe  Image: notebookcheck

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